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Brisbane suburbs going up in value

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Ipswich Investor, Investment properties, Property Management, Real Estate Ipswich, Mortgage Broker Ipswich, Ipswich property market, Ipswich Rental Properties

Property and rental value in some of Brisbane’s suburbs is increasing. Check out this list to see if your suburb is the place to invest in 2014.

NundahIpswich Investor, Investment properties, Property Management, Real Estate Ipswich, Mortgage Broker Ipswich, Ipswich property market, Ipswich Rental Properties

Where is it: 8km north-east of the CBD, next to Toombul and Geebung.

Why it’s trending: Property prices are still relatively low, given its proximity to the city and great transport links. The recent ‘I (heart) Nundah’ campaign is hinting at its growing appeal to a younger market.

Median rent: $425/week for a three-bedroom

Median sale price: $610k for a four-bedroom

Cultural hotspots: Centred Art on Hamson Terrace, with its curated selection of Indigenous and local art.

Foodie hotspots: Nundah Village has a good selection of independent cafes for weekend brunches, and you’re a 10 minute drive to Paddington and Red Hill.

Who your neighbours are: Young families who work in the city.

Wynnum

Where is it: Next door to Manly on the east coast of Brisbane, approx. 16 km from the CBD.

Why it’s trending: Bayside properties are the next big thing in Brisbane, as people move out of the overpriced inner-west and seek seaside living with good links back to the CBD.

Median rent: $400/week or a three-bedroom

Median sale price: $417k for a three-bedroom

Cultural hotspots: Wynnum Markets – held daily – have some excellent vintage treasures and antiques for the home, as well as showcasing local artists

Foodie hotspots: There are some great local cafes opening up along the waterfront, as well as a good selection of high-street chains – Capers Pizza, Sushi Train etc. The older-style waterfront pubs are enjoying a revival and serve great food.

Who your neighbours are: Aspirational 35 to 44 year-olds with teenage children.

Chermside

Where is it: 10km north of the CBD, next to Aspley.

Why it’s trending: Once seen as the daggy stopping point between the CBD and the northern suburbs, Chermside is coming into its own as an affordable, convenient and bustling suburb with excellent transpor.

Median rent: $390/week for a three-bedroom

Median sale price: $440k for a three-bedroom

Cultural hotspots: Forget Westfield Chermside – although it is convenient – and head up Gympie Road towards Wooloowin for local galleries and theatres.

Foodie hotspots: Scuzi at Westfield Chermside is surprisingly good for Saturday brunch, while Bella Cosi serves authentic Italian in a beautiful space.

Who your neighbours are: Independent 20 to 30 year-olds who work both creative and public sector jobs.

Annerley

Where is it: 6km south of the CBD (and 3km from UQ St Lucia using the Green Bridge), Annerley connects to the rest of Brisbane via Ipswich Road and easy access to the Clem 7 tunnel.

Why it’s trending: Several new apartment blocks and a new shopping complex are turning the tired Annerley strip into somewhere convenient and fresh. Trendy cafes are popping up and the new Red Lotus and Billy Kart Kitchen have been immediate hits with locals.

Median rent: $450 per week – units $380 per week

Median sale price: $535,000 – units $378,666

Foodie hotspots: Groove Café, Billy Kart Kitchen, Café O-Mai, Azafran, Red Lotus, BOX’D Espresso Bar.

Who your neighbours are: Young professionals (25-34 years) with children.

Auchenflower

Where is it: 3km south of the CBD, next to Toowong and Milton.

Why it’s trending: Toowong’s little sister is growing into her own – close to the city, UQ St Lucia and the hotspots of Paddington and Toowong, Auchenflower is a quiet achiever and certainly one to watch

Median rent: $530 per week for three bedroom

Median sale price: $760,000 for three bed

Cultural hotspots: Mt Coot-tha Botanic Gardens.

Foodie hotspots: Café Auchenflower, Deer Duck Bistro, Toro Bar, Grimes Bistro.

Who your neighbours are: University students and young professionals.

 Tennyson

Where is it: Just under 10km from the city – easy access via train line.

Why it’s trending: The new Queensland tennis centre is just the beginning for Tennyson. Close to hotspot Yeronga, Tennyson’s development is pointing in the direction of up-and-coming. If gentrification plans for Yeerongpilly go ahead, Tennyson (with its low investment prices) will be the place to be.

Median rent: $420 per week for three bedroom

Median sale price: $529,000

Cultural hotspot: Queensland Tennis Centre.

Foodie hotspots: Buzz Tennyson, The Hyde Out, Anesis.

Who your neighbours are: Older couples and families.

Dutton Park

Where is it: Dutton Park lies east of the Brisbane River, opposite from St Lucia. It’s 4km from Brisbane CBD, a 5-7 minute drive or 14 minutes by train.

Why it’s trending: Dutton Park’s appeal lies in its river frontage and proximity to the CBD. Many of the old style cottages have been recently renovated into modern apartments. It’s well serviced by public transport, and currently look forwards to development of the Boggo Road precinct – proposed to be a residential, retail and commercial centre.

Median rent: $540/week for a three-bedroom

Median sale price: $624k for a three-bedroom

Cultural hotspots: Dutton Park is dominated by a recreation area which is popular for picnics, tranquil riverside walks and a free-leash area for your furry friend. Otherwise, most locals head to the city for cultural events.

Foodie hotspots: Woolloongabba is a stone’s throw from Dutton Park, where an upcoming bar scene can be found. The Canvas Club, Chalk Hotel and Brewhouse Brisbane are the best picks of the bunch.

Who your neighbours are: It has a population of approximately 4100, comprised mostly of independent, working adults.

Fun Fact: The Boggo Road Gaol opened in 1883, and was only demolished in 1996.

Balmoral

Where is it: Balmoral is an inner eastern suburb, 9km from the CBD, a 10-15 minute drive, or 20 minutes by train.

Why it’s trending: Balmoral was the top Brisbane suburb for house value growth in 2013, with a rise of 15.2 per cent. It’s also a neighbour of Bulimba – a popular, picturesque village.

Median rent: $700/week for a three-bedroom

Median sale price: $677k for a three-bedroom

Cultural hotspots: Balmoral Park and the Cineplex are two local hangouts spots for the weekend.

Foodie hotspots: The Oxford Street precinct has plenty of award-winning alfresco dining options.

Who your neighbours will be: The median age for Balmoral is about 35, and is populated by working adults, established couples and families.

Fun Fact: Balmoral is an Anglicisation of Baile Mhoireil’ which is Scottish Gaelic for ‘beautiful residence’ or ‘majestic castle.

Mitchelton

Where is it: Mitchelton is 8km northwest from Brisbane CBD, a 15-20 minute drive or 35 minutes by train.

Why it’s trending: Many Brisbane families have found an ideal home in Mitchelton. The parks and recreation facilities, schools and low crime rate have been ranked as the top factors.

Median rent: $360/week for a three-bedroom

Median buy: $480k for a three-bedroom

Cultural hotspots: Brookside Shopping Centre is the largest retail precinct in northwest Brisbane

Foodie hotspots: Mitchelton residents flock to the farmers’ markets, held monthly on a Sunday morning, for the gourmet delicatessen foods, fresh produce and artisan breads.

Who your neighbours will be: Established/older couples and families with children. Mitchelton also has a diverse, multicultural community.

Fun Fact: Mitchelton’s name comes from one particular English family, who settled in the area in the 1870s

Sandgate

Where is it: Sandgate is a coastal suburb located 16 km north of the Brisbane CBD.

Why it’s trending: Sandgate’s position on Brisbane’s coastline is attracting families who want a relaxed lifestyle, while still being within a close commute to the Brisbane CBD.

Median rent: $410/week for a three-bedroom

Median buy: $473k for a three-bedroom

Cultural hotspots: Sandgate hosts a range of festivals and markets each year, including the Sandgate Bluewater Festival and the Music By The Sea Festival.

Foodie hotspots: There are plenty of seaside cafes and takeaways opening up along the Sandgate waterfront including Little Crepe Factory and Dougs, as well as a new cool and quirky drinking establishment Cardigan Bar.

Who your neighbours will be: Established/older couples and families and elderly singles.

Redcliffe

Where is it: Redcliffe is a residential suburb of the Moreton Bay Region, approximately 28 kilometres north-north-east of Brisbane.

Why it’s trending: The Moreton Bay Region is one of the fastest developing places in Australia and with its low median prices Redcliffe appeals to older generations wanting a getaway from the city, without living on the coast

Median rent: $330/week for a three-bedroom

Median buy: $330k for a three-bedroom

Cultural hotspots: The Redcliffe Jetty markets are on every Sunday on the Redcliffe foreshore.

Foodie hotspots:  Redcliffe has plenty of pubs, clubs and cafes along its foreshore including Brick Bistro Bar, The Rustic Olive, Workshop Co. Expresso Bar, and Feel Goodz Gourmet Café.

Who your neighbours will be: Elderly singles, older couples and families and older independence.

Carindale

Where is it: Carindale is located 10 km east of the Brisbane CBD.

Why it’s trending: With its close proximity to the city and affordable pricing, there has been an increase in independent youth and maturing couples venturing to this east side suburb.

Median rent: $450/week for a three-bedroom

Median buy: $570k for a three-bedroom

Cultural hotspots: Carindale is home to Westfield Carindale,which became the sixth-largest shopping centre in Australia on completion of redevelopment in 2012.

Foodie hotspots: Carindale offers a diverse international palette, with some of the favourite hotspots of this suburb according to Urbanspoon being Chang Tong Thai, Asia House Chinese, Roman Empire restaurant, A Night In India and Backstreet Expresso.

Who your neighbours will be: Older couples and families and older independents are currently among the majority in Carindale, with younger trends recently being seen in the suburb.

 

Original article published at www.bmag.com.au  6/3/2014

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Rainwater tanks and temporary barriers could protect Brisbane from floods

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Rainwater tanks and temporary barriers could protect Brisbane from floods

Queenslanders will be encouraged to raise and wet-proof their homes to protect against damage from floods, while temporary barriers could protect parts of the Brisbane CBD from inundation.

A flood-resilient building guide has been released by the state government alongside a new Brisbane River Strategic Floodplain Management Plan.

The guidelines for property owners are non-mandatory and do not replace requirements under the Building Act.

It includes recommendations for flood-resilient design options, such as elevating the finished floor level, wet-proofing the house to allow water to enter and leave without causing significant damage, dry-proofing to prevent water from entering a building, ventilation to prevent mould, and permeable fencing.

Home builders could also use rainwater tanks to store storm water that may otherwise contribute to flooding.

State Development Minister Cameron Dick said home owners were encouraged to talk to a licensed builder or architect about the guide and how they could incorporate flood-resilience strategies into their homes to reduce the cost and impact of future floods.

Meanwhile, the strategic plan, created with the Brisbane, Ipswich, Somerset and Lockyer Valley councils, Queensland government and Seqwater, includes 52 recommendations to strengthen flood resilience of communities in the Brisbane River flood plain.

It suggests consideration of temporary flood barriers in the Brisbane CBD and South Brisbane to prevent flooding.

“The temporary nature of the barriers means that they can be deployed in locations that are normally used for other purposes such as roadways,” the strategic plan reads.

Initial assessments suggested temporary flood barriers could provide flood immunity up to the one in 100-year flood level for South Brisbane and one in 200 years for the Brisbane CBD.

Consideration should also be given to a flood gate which could be installed along Marsden Parade in the Ipswich CBD to prevent backwater flooding from the Bremer River.

“When the flood gates are closed, the rail embankment would act as a temporary dam wall and prevent flooding of low-lying land, being the Ipswich CBD,” the report reads.

It also suggests Goodna could be protected from a one in 100-year flood through the installation of a flood wall levee along the Ipswich Motorway.

Ipswich City Council chief executive David Farmer said the flood gate and levee options would undergo feasibility testing as part of the development of a flood plain management plan for Ipswich.

The report estimates that during a one in 100-year flood in the Brisbane River flood plain, 17,300 buildings would be flooded, two-thirds of which would be in the Brisbane City Council area.

Out of that total, 12,000 were expected to be flooded above the main habitable floor level.

A one in 100-year flood would cost $6.8 billion, which was comparable to damages from the 2011 floods.

Mr Dick said the strategic plan was produced following the 2011 floods.

“Those floods left a deep scar across south-east Queensland and across those communities and families as well,” he said.

Mr Dick said as a result of the plan, councils would be better placed to make decisions about where development could and could not occur.

“It’s increased the capacity of councils to make proper planning decisions, for example, councils could take action such as acquiring land … that is zoned as urban, and acquire it and rezone it for non-urban purposes,” he said.

Mr Dick said while floods could not be prevented, the impacts on properties could be reduced.

“This [plan] has taken four years to produce – there’s been 50,000 computer model simulation and we’ve researched 134,000 properties that have been affected by flooding,” he said.

Councils will use the strategic plan to inform their flood plain management plans.

Souce: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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Three bedroom North Booval, Qld townhouse listed for mortgagee sale

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Three bedroom North Booval, Qld townhouse listed for mortgagee sale

A three bedroom North Booval, Qld townhouse has been listed with an asking price of $175,000.

It is described in the listing as a “perfect home base for travellers or downsizers or tenant ready investment opportunity.”

Gai Flynn of First National Real Estate holds the listing.

Situated at 90/50 Gledson Street, North Booval the property is made up of three bedrooms two bathrooms and a single garage.

Set on 130 sqm, every bedroom features a ceiling fans, vertical blinds and built-in robes.

Featuring a concreted alfresco outdoor plus shady shrubs for privacy.

Located withing ‘The Complex’ which has a swimming pool and BBQ facilities available for residents and is 1.2 kilometre to the Bundamba train station.

The median price for a home in North Booval is $279,500 according to CoreLogic, which calculate its annual change in median price over the past 10 years as -3.1%.

Source: www.propertyobserver.com.au

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Affordable havens The sub $300,000 suburbs on the verge of extinction in Brisbane

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Affordable-havens-The-sub-300000-suburbs-on-the-verge-of-extinction-in-Brisbane

Suburbs with a median house price of $300,000 or less are on the verge of extinction in Greater Brisbane. So, where can you still buy property for that price in 2019?

SUBURBS with a median house price of $300,000 or less are on the verge of extinction across Brisbane.

Figures from property researcher CoreLogic show house prices in some of the city’s most affordable postcodes experienced above average growth over the past year, leading to a drop in sales at lower price points.

Only 1.7 per cent of properties in Brisbane changed hands for less than $200,000 in 2018.

In 2019, there are no longer any suburbs in the Brisbane local government area with a median house price of $300,000 or less.

Affordable-havens-The-sub-300000-suburbs-the-verge-of-extinction-in-Brisbane

Across Greater Brisbane, there are now only 19 mainland suburbs with a median house price under $300,000, whereas there were double that number a decade ago.

The last affordable havens can be found in the Ipswich suburbs of Riverview, Dinmore and One Mile, in the Logan locations of Kingston, Logan Central and Woodridge and in Caboolture South in Moreton Bay.

The median house price in Greater Brisbane is now $532,000, according to CoreLogic.

More than a third of sales in Brisbane during 2018 were between $400,000 and $600,000, while 7.8 per cent were at $1 million or more.

CoreLogic senior analyst Cameron Kusher said that was a drastic change from the state of affairs over the past couple of decades, with the majority of sales in 1993 and 1998 coming in below $200,000.

“Over time, there has been a steady climb in the share of sales across the more expensive price points,” Mr Kusher said.

“While you’d expect this in the markets that have seen strong value growth such as Sydney, Melbourne and Hobart, we have also seen it across markets where value growth has been much weaker.”

Affordable-havens-The-sub-300000-suburbs-on-the-verge-of-extinction-Brisbane

Mr Kusher said that even though he expected slightly more sales to occur at lower price points over the next year, he did not expect any material change in the share of sales under $200,000 — in fact they may reduce even further.

Real Estate Institute of Queensland chief executive Antonia Mercorella said Brisbane still had plenty of affordable suburbs with good quality housing compared to Sydney and Melbourne.

“We have so many affordable options in really high growth suburbs,” Ms Mercorella said.

“They’re not going to run out tomorrow.

“And many are still within a 12km to 15km radius of the city, which is pretty mind-blowing compared with Sydney and Melbourne.”

Affordable-havens-The-sub-300000-suburbs-in-the-verge-of-extinction-in-Brisbane

Ms Mercorella said Brisbane’s affordable havens provided great opportunities for entry level property buyers.

“Many people assume a $300,000 house must be a dump, but that’s just not the case in the southeast corner,” she said.

“Low price does not mean low quality.”

Nick Kruger, principal of Your Haven Realty, said there were still plenty of opportunities for first home buyers to get a foot on the property ladder in Riverview, which has the cheapest median house price in Greater Brisbane.

MORE: Labor’s plan to hit Brisbane rents

Mr Kruger said that he had noticed a shift in the buyer profile in the market as a result of the banks cracking down on lending.

“Predominantly, in the past, investors were snapping up these properties for their SMSF because of the good rental returns,” Mr Kruger said.

“Now the banks have cracked down, that’s incentivising a market change.

“It’s better for owner-occupiers now, because they have a chance to get it over investors.

“But in time, obviously these prices will jump so the sooner you can get in, the better.”

Affordable-havens-The-sub-300000-suburbs-on-verge-of-extinction-in-Brisbane

He is marketing a three-bedroom house at 57 Price St, Riverview, which is currently leased for $290 a week and is on the market for offers over $245,000.

“That’s a good figure for an investor,” Mr Kruger said.

“At that price point, for a three-bedder on a 600 sqm plus block so close to Redbank Plaza and within 5 minutes walk of sought-after schools, I definitely it’s ideal for first home buyers or young families.”

Single parent Telita Webb has rented the home with three of her children for the past year, but would love to buy the property if she could afford the deposit.

“I love the place; Riverview’s my home,” Ms Webb said.

Chris and Tiffany Campbell live in Bundamba, which is one of greater Brisbane’s last affordable havens — just scraping in with a median house price of $292,752.

The couple are renovating a turn-of-the-century Queenslander, which they recently bought for $315,000.

“Bundamba has a bad wrap; I’m not sure why,” Mrs Campbell said.

“The street we live in is so quiet and full of beautiful, old Queenslanders, and you can see the growth potential.

“I think it is one of those places a lot of people forget about.”

They sold another property last year that they had bought and renovated two years earlier in North Ipswich and made more than $100,000 in profit.

we knew going into it and paying price we did in an up andcoming suburb it was going to be a good investment

Affordable-havens-The-sub-300000-suburbs-in-the-verge-of-extinction-in-Brisbane

Propertyology managing director Simon Pressley said Ipswich was becoming a popular location for property investors because of its affordability, solid rental yields and good infrastructure.

But Mr Pressley said he was not convinced the region had the ability to create the volume of jobs required to put pressure on the local labour market and drive property prices significantly higher.

“One could do worse than investing in Ipswich, however, my overall rating of the Ipswich property market is a middle-of-the-road performer for the feasible future,” Mr Pressley said.

THE SUB $300,000 SUBURBS ON THE VERGE OF EXTINCTION IN 2019:

Suburb Region Median house Change in median Change in median

price Mar 2019 12 mths to Nov 2018 5yrs

1. Riverview Ipswich $256,787 -2.3% 13.7%

2. Dinmore Ipswich $259,481 9.0% 35.2%

3. One Mile Ipswich $260,181 0.0% 15.9%

4. Leichhardt Ipswich $264,565 2.1% 22.5%

5. Rosewood Ipswich $273,359 6.9% 19.2%

6. Logan Central Logan $273,541 -3.4% 26.1%

7. Woodridge Logan $274,352 -1.3% 28.1%

8. Basin Pocket Ipswich $275,769 -4.6% 25.6%

9. Ebbw Vale Ipswich $276,599 -6.1% 20.3%

10. Kingston Logan $285,032 -2.4% 24.2%

11. Goodna Ipswich $285,329 -4.1% 10.8%

12. Tivoli Ipswich $292,168 -2.7% 8.6%

13. Bundamba Ipswich $292,752 4% 14.4%

14. North Booval Ipswich $293,058 4.6% 17.9%

15. Caboolture South Moreton Bay $293,517 0.6% 16.2%

16. Gailes Ipswich $293,572 0.7% 11.8%

17. Churchill Ipswich $295,020 1.1% 7.2%

18. East Ipswich Ipswich $297,405 13% 27.1%

19. Wulkaraka Ipswich $299,733 6% 2.6%

(Source: CoreLogic)

Originally published as What $300K will buy you in 2019

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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