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Historic flood study gets tick from Ipswich leaders

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FAIRER insurance premiums and a more sensible approach to flood plain management.

That is what Ipswich Mayor Paul Pisasale and Deputy Mayor Paul Tully says should be the result of the new Brisbane River Catchment Flood Study Report released today.

Deputy Premier Jackie Trad said the study incorporated 170 years of historical rainfall data and investigated 11,340 scenarios that influence flooding, in a process “involving more than 50,000 computer simulations which has helped us produce Australia’s first ever whole of catchment flood study”.

“The Queensland Floods Commission of Inquiry recommended this study because there is currently no single flood model that councils can use that provided a common and consistent basis for land-use planning, disaster management and building community resilience,” Ms Trad said.

Cr Pisasale said the unique study had come about after a four-year partnership between the Queensland Government and Seqwater and Ipswich, Brisbane, Lockyer Valley and Somerset councils following the devastating 2011 floods.

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He said the flood study was “the flood bible for planners” and said it had been put together by “the best of the best”.

“While councils are still the best source of information for detailed, localised flood information, the study will support a more coordinated approach to managing floods across all levels of government in the future,” he said.

“Insurance companies have been giving people bills based on postcodes and making a lot of money out of people’s tragedy.

“But now they have got a document which will give people certainty and they will know if they are being charged extra for flood insurance when they are not in a flood area.

“It will give certainty for people buying property and certainty for planners.

“We are not going to allow development in flood areas and we will not be making the mistakes of the past.”

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Ipswich Deputy Mayor Paul Tully, who lost his Goodna home in the 2011 flood, has welcome the report and described it as a “sensible approach to flood plain management”.

Cr Tully said residents of Goodna which was the worst-affected suburb in southeast Queensland in the 2011 flood with 600 properties flooded would benefit from the findings.

He said the report proposed a possible new flood regulation line at Goodna of 16.5 metres AHD which was two metres lower than the current adopted flood level of 18.6 metres.

He said 16.5 metres was equal to the 2011 Brisbane River flood at Goodna and 18.6 metres was the 1974 flood level.

AHD is Australian Height Datum and generally reflects normal sea or river levels.

“If adopted by the Ipswich City Council, this would enable more properties near the edge of the current flood zone at Goodna around the William St, Queen St, Bertha St and Parker St areas to be redeveloped.

“I fully support the adoption of the new flood regulation line by Ipswich City Council which is a sensible compromise for both commercial and residential development.”

Cr Tully also called for insurance companies to adopt the new flood line and reduce flood insurance premiums across Ipswich and Brisbane.

“This should lead to lower insurance premiums as a matter of fairness and equity, two virtues not normally associated with insurance companies,” Cr Tully said.

Ms Trad said the Brisbane River catchment area spanned “more than 13,500 square kilometres with the floodplain downstream of Wivenhoe Dam spanning the four local government areas of Brisbane, Ipswich, Somerset and Lockyer Valley.”

 

Originally Published: https://www.qt.com.au/

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SEQ begins big push for a billion-dollar City Deal

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SEQ begins big push for a billion-dollar City Deal

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk (left) and Treasurer Jackie Trad are pushing for a City Deal for south-east Queensland.

Photo: AAP/Dan Peled

Political delays dogging infrastructure projects will be history if talks on Tuesday morning cement a new billion-dollar 15-year City Deal for south-east Queensland between all three levels of government.

Such a deal could benefit 3 million people catching trains and buses, driving on highways, building businesses, looking for housing, and finding school and universities between the Sunshine and Gold coasts and west to Toowoomba.

Deputy premier Jackie Trad and Brisbane’s lord mayor Graham Quirk will on Tuesday morning outline how close the 10 south-east Queensland councils – Brisbane, Ipswich, Logan, Moreton Bay, Redland, Scenic Rim, Somerset, Sunshine Coast, Toowoomba and Lockyer Valley – are to signing Australia’s largest City Deal with the federal government.

Australia now has three City Deals backed by the federal government: Townsville (2016), Launceston (April 2017) and Western Sydney (March 2018).

Cr Quirk, the chairman of Council of Mayors (SEQ) that represents the region’s local governments, described a City Deal for the area as “a dramatic change”.

“The power of aligning the efforts of all levels of government and securing a long-term program of investment in our region will be a game changer,” Cr Quirk said.

“For the first time, all levels of government will be working in unison to protect and enhance the prosperity and liveability of south-east Queensland.”

SEQ begins big push for a billion-dollar City Deal
Brisbane’s lord mayor Graham Quirk begins a campaign for a City Deal funding package for 10 councils on Tuesday morning.
Photo: Fairfax Media

A City Deal binds the three levels of government — federal, state and local — as a group to agree to a 15-year rolling funding program of infrastructure projects that a fast-growing region needs.

As projects provide a lift in land value, that financial uplift is identified, captured and then re-invested into the infrastructure funding pool, under a model first identified in Manchester in 2012 and then in Brisbane in 2014.

In April 2018, Cr Quirk and Ms Trad met the federal government’s new Cities and Urban Infrastructure minister Paul Fletcher, when they first put forward the SEQ City Deal.

All parties described those 2018 talks as “positive”.

Cr Quirk and Ms Trad will begin the public push for the SEQ City Deal at a business breakfast at Brisbane’s Convention and Exhibition Centre on Tuesday.

“We secured Australia’s first ever City Deal in Townsville, which is paying dividends with projects like the North Queensland Stadium, delivered through the City Deal,” Ms Trad said.

“That is under construction and on track to be open for the start of the 2020 NRL season.”

Townsville’s City Deal is a 15-year arrangement, while Launceston’s is a five-year deal and Western Sydney’s is a 20-year deal.

The federal government is tipped to announce City Deals for Geelong and Darwin by September 2018, allowing planners to work on Hobart, Perth and south-east Queensland over 18 months.

How could it help?

It locks in project funds over 15 to 20 years, moving them away from political promises, which are subject to election outcomes. It could remove election squabbling over the same project.

It sets out a timetable for  projects allowing the private sector to invest more confidently.

It could help the next generation of infrastructure projects, after the Pacific Motorway, Cross River Rail and Brisbane Metro projects were all delayed by politics, angering voters.

It has also been mentioned as a way of funding Moreton Bay’s new university campus at Petrie and breathing life into the Brisbane River’s Resilient Rivers proposal.

What is Townsville’s experience after 18 months?

The Townsville City Deal was signed on December 9, 2016. It is a 15-year agreement.

Work has begun on stage two of the 25,000-seat $250 million North Queensland Stadium. It will be finished for the 2020 rugby league season. It is funded by the federal and state governments, and Townsville City Council.

The Queensland government has promised $250 million for new water supply for Townsville.

A business case for new Townsville Port facilities is almost finished and the Queensland government has pledged $75 million for port upgrade.

Townville mayor Jenny Hill said choosing the right projects was essential to make a City Deal effective.

“The City Deal provides a roadmap for delivery that breaks the political cycle so it is very important to choose the right projects or areas for reform that will make the biggest difference to a city or region,” Cr Hill said.

“All three levels of government also need to buy into the key priorities of the local area that are included in any City Deal.”

SEQ begins big push for a billion-dollar City Deal

Townsville Mayor Jenny Hill on top of Castle Hill with Townsville in the background.
Photo: supplied

SEQ City Deal – the background

  • May 2012Co-funding model idea began in United Kingdom.
  • June 2015: Queensland prepares its own case for City Deals after Ms Trad looked at the UK City Deals idea in Manchester.
  • 2016: Council of Mayors (SEQ), Queensland Property Council and the Queensland government put a plan together.
  • November 2016: Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk signed a memorandum of understanding with prime minister Malcolm Turnbull in November 2016 to develop “tailored City Deals” for Queensland.
  • February 2017: Ms Trad and Cr Quirk wrote to then-federal cities minister Angus Taylor, agreeing to a joint submission.
  • Late 2017: A Cities Transformation TaskForce established in Brisbane.
  • June 2018: Queensland’s major contractors called for a City Deal.

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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Interstate migrants are moving to QLD … but they’re not coming to Brisbane

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Interstate migrants are moving to QLD

Less than 5 per cent of interstate migrants during the 2016-2017 financial year settled in Brisbane, according to data from the ABS. Photo: Glenn Hunt

Interstate migration to Queensland is booming but analysis shows most new residents are bypassing Brisbane for other regions in the Sunshine State.

Buyers’ agency Propertyology analysed ABS data, which showed there were 17,246 internal migrations to Queensland in 2016-17. But out of those, only 846 relocated to Brisbane, which equates to less than 5 per cent.

Propertyology managing director Simon Pressley said the lion’s share went to the Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, Moreton Bay, Cairns, Ipswich and the Scenic Rim.

Interstate migration to Queensland is strong but ABS figures reveal most of the new residents are relocating to regions outside of Brisbane, such as the Gold Coast.

“We’ve read a lot about interstate migration to Queensland lately and it’s been growing each year, which is great,” he said.

“The thing is, people automatically think Queensland means Brisbane but when you actually look closely at the numbers, they tell a very different story.”

As a proportion of total population growth over 2016-17, the biggest beneficiaries of interstate migration were Tasmania (22.5 per cent) and Queensland (21.9 per cent).

Interstate migrants are moving to QLD

The Sunshine Coast has had an influx of interstate migrants. Photo: Mike Swaine

House prices in the regions with the most internal migrations have mainly increased — house prices on the Sunshine and Gold Coasts have increased by 7.9 per cent and 3.3 per cent respectively over the past 12 months — although Mr Pressley said the correlation between population growth and house price growth was often overstated.

“I know logically it makes sense — if an area has a big surge in population, house prices should go up — but there’s much more to it than that,” he said.

“Jobs growth is a lot more important than population growth, so is wage growth, [and] affordability is also extremely important.”

Interstate migrants are moving to QLD

Moreton Bay’s affordable property prices and relaxed bayside lifestyle are drawing new residents from interstate. Photo: Ray White Redcliffe

REIQ Gold Coast zone chair Andrew Henderson said each of those factors was connected and all had contributed to the Gold Coast’s house price success in recent years.

“Our local economy is strong but it’s also changed. We’re no longer solely reliant on the tourism industry. The diversity of our job offering has changed,” he said.

“With new infrastructure like universities and hospitals, we’ve got people moving here from interstate into jobs who would have never been able to move here 10, 20 years ago.

“So the age of the people we’ve got moving here has also changed. We’ve always had a lot of retirees but we’ve noticed a surge in people in their 20s, 30s and 40s – people moving their whole families up here. Around Mermaid Waters and Clear Island Waters there’s a really strong southern presence.”

Andrew Campbell of Ray White Redcliffe said the influx of interstate migrants buying up locally in the Moreton Bay region had become apparent more recently.

“We noticed a dip in the interstaters for a while but recently they’ve started to come back and it’s about affordability. All the properties around that median price are really moving so quickly,” he said.

Domain Group figures show the median house price in Moreton Bay is $456,000.

“There’s a lot of first-home buyers who fly up here for the weekend from Sydney. They know they can’t afford to buy there so they’re moving here because they see you can buy a house for under $500,000, get the lifestyle and still only have to drive 40 minutes to work in Brisbane,” Mr Campbell said.

But Mr Pressley said interstate migrants were being “pushed” to Queensland, rather “pulled” as they were during the mining boom.

“People have always wanted to come to Queensland because of the good lifestyle, weather and affordable housing,” he said.

“In the past they came for those things but also because we created more jobs year after year than everyone else. Now, we’re not dragging here through job growth, they’re coming here by default.

“To me, that’s why interstate migration hasn’t translated into property prices yet … and that’s why only minimal people have gone to Brisbane.

“I anticipate that in the next 12 months we’re going to see another really strong year of interstate migration into Queensland; if our economy improves, then it could translate to property prices for Brisbane and all over Queensland. Overall though, this is a good news story for Queensland and Brisbane as well. It’s looking positive.”

Source: goldcoastinvestor.com.au

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$10,000 to boost international students numbers in Ipswich

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USQ international students Samikshya Paudel and Nisha Thapa moved to Australia from Nepal to study nursing at the Ipswich campus. They are among a growing group of young people flocking to the city, new data shows.
USQ international students Samikshya Paudel and Nisha Thapa moved to Australia from Nepal to study nursing at the Ipswich campus. They are among a growing group of young people flocking to the city, new data shows.

A RED carpet will be rolled out for international students in a bid to entice youngsters to Ipswich.

The city has been successful in securing a $10,000 grant to better market the city on the international education stage.

International education is already the second biggest export for Queensland, worth about $4.37 billion to the state’s economy.

Ipswich MP Jennifer Howard said more people were visiting Ipswich than ever before.

“We also have some of the best education institutions in the country – it makes sense,” Ms Howard said.

“That’s why we’re investing in international education in Ipswich. We’re making sure Ipswich Regional Education Consortium has the funding it needs to grow our international education sector in years to come.”

Last year, a working group led by Ipswich City Council considered ways to continue driving growth in the international education sector.

The project was funded through the International Education and Training Partnership Fund which aims to encourage the sector to collaborate and work on innovative projects that position Queensland as a world class destination for international students.

Federal data for 2017 showed Ipswich’s international education market grew by 39.2 per cent with most of Ipswich’s international student enrolments coming from China and India.

University of Southern Queensland student Samikshya Paudel moved to Australia from Nepal in February 2017.

She’s in her second year of studying a bachelor of nursing at USQ Ipswich.

Samikshya said Australia offered a safe environment to study where people at her campus were friendly and the staff supportive.

“I chose to study nursing because it’s a good profession that you can learn every skill from communication to leadership,” Samikshya said, in June when new figures on international students were released.

“After university my plan is to return to my home country and apply the skills I have learnt at USQ to help people in my country.”

Today, Tourism Industry Development Minister and Ministerial Champion for International Education Kate Jones said the $10,000 in funding for Ipswich Regional Education Consortium was part of a wider Study Queensland campaign.

Ms Jones said Study Queensland’s ‘Start here. Go anywhere’ campaign was devised after months of market research to discover what motivates students to choose Queensland above other states.

“More students from across the globe are choosing to travel to Queensland every year and our international education industry has grown by around 12 per cent in the last year.

“But we know we can do more to support the student experience and ensure sustained growth in the future. This campaign is all about capitalising on our great foundation to increase our share of the international education market.

“International education currently supports around 19,000 jobs across the state. With this new campaign, we hope to grow this industry to support an extra 6800 jobs by 2026.

“That’s why we’re investing more than $25 million in this space to grow our international education sector.”

Source: www.qt.com.au

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