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What’s in store for the property market for the 2016/2017 financial year?

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What’s driving the market at the moment?

At this stage there are several factors affecting each of the big three east coast markets currently.

Melbourne: Melbourne is in a bit of a fluctuating period from the data we see. There is a large amount of supply both in approval and construction phases all the way from Docklands to Werribee. The next three to five years are going to be very suburb specific for growth. Pure Property Investment (PPI) is still looking for established property under the $400,000 market in the north and south-west within 25 kilometres of the city.

Sydney: Similar story, still a large undersupply issue in certain pockets of the greater metropolitan areas and the demand looks set to continue into the next decade. Affordability and wage growth are the major limiting factors we see in general. We do see some value in the established pockets of the middle ring (20 kilometres from the city), however cash flow is not attractive at this stage. We see more value coming to hand in the next three to five years.

Brisbane: Our data suggests that Brisbane will continue to show a nice period of sustained growth into 2020. Its limiting factor in the past has been state government commitment to large-scale infrastructure projects, however, we are starting to see some stronger and more stable jobs figures and in the pockets of Ipswich, Lower Logan/Beenleigh and Moreton Bay. We see (and have seen for the past 24 months) some excellent opportunities to pick up properties around the $300,000 mark in areas which are seeing large scale gentrification and great yields.

Hobart: The east coast’s sleepy cousin is stirring a little and there are some good signs in the short-to-medium term for jobs growth. With the rise of the tourism dollar (specifically China) there is a very tight vacancy rate and demand is building. I see a good couple of years with good cash flow opportunities up to the year 2020.

Adelaide: PPI are a bit bearish in the next two to three years, with some of the large scale manufacturing plants closing over the short term. The announcement of the $50 billion submarine project will provide a great boost with an additional 3,000 or so high paying jobs flowing from this. However this project has a 15-year horizon and as such we don’t see the benefits coming in until around 2019 to 2022.

Perth: Well, it’s a bit of a tale of ‘if you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all’. Perth has some very depressed markets which are getting more depressed by the day. The only saving grace for Perth property investors at this stage are the historically low interest rates. They are not showing any real sign of transitioning their economy from iron ore and gas to mainstream economic drivers. If the state federal government can’t drive jobs growth in the next one to two years before the interests rates start to rise, I do see a blood bath in the short term as investors will not be able to hold their investments once interest rates start to rise. However, the savvy investor will most certainly keep a distinct eye on this market and if we see a turnaround in the days on market, jobs growth and buyer sentiment there will be some distinct bargains to be had.

Darwin: Similar to Perth, we see some distinct challenges in jobs growth and economic diversification. If the new gas project gets off the ground we may see some prolonged price stability, however PPI are bearish on Darwin at this stage.

Canberra: The little engine that could, Canberra continues to deliver investors a solid and stable return. With the Q4 2015/2016 data showing Canberra has delivered the country’s best growth (at over 3 per cent) for the quarter, a stable government and jobs market will continue to provide a safe return for investors. Cash flow is a little slim and entry point is a bit higher (around the $450,000 to $550,000 mark).

So what’s the cash flow situation in general for each state?

Melbourne: Supply on the market and coming to the market is looking very high, and we believe this is going to depress yields for the next three to five years.

Sydney: The more tightly held (non-developable) areas have seen a slightly higher yield albeit a small bump. Sydney is expensive and that is still keeping many Generation Y’s in the rental market as they can’t afford to enter the home buyers/investor market. However the data suggests yields are around the 3 to 4 per cent depending on the area and we don’t see that changing. Creative investors are always looking to add cash flow (granny flats, share accommodation, developing blocks, etc).

Brisbane: One of the better cash flow markets across the country with strong yields and good demand. Stick to the growing areas of Ipswich, Beenleigh/Logan, Moreton Bay where we are buying 6 per cent plus yielding (sub 15-year-old) properties in growth areas. Be sure to understand the vacancy rates and unemployment situations however as they can prove to be very important in these markets.

Hobart: Very tight supply (sub 2 per cent) which is providing great return for cash flow investors. Stick to the middle/outer suburbs (10 to 25 kilometres from city). We are picking up properties which are providing 7 to 8 per cent yields regularly.

Adelaide: Stick to the middle/inner rings. Cash-flow is okay in Adelaide at the moment, and we see that continuing into the next two to three years. Though 5 per cent gross yields are readily achievable, I would steer clear of the outer rings until we see the true fallout of the manufacturing sector.

Perth and Darwin: Cash-flow is okay, but the big caveat is the demand factor. On paper, the properties are achieving 5 per cent gross but the vacancy rates are increasing by the day and this will be a big issue in the long run.

Canberra: With low vacancy rates within the 15 kilometre ring of our capital we see an even keel return of around the 4 to 4.5 per cent gross mark. This is not lighting anyone’s socks on fire, however it’s pretty consistent and looks to remain that way.

So which regions have the most potential for capital growth under $450,000? Which regions have limited potential?

Brisbane: Still our number one pick at the moment, specifically out towards Ipswich, Lower Logan suburbs and Moreton Bay. Price point is still extremely affordable, yields are excellent and demand/jobs creation is building.

Perth and Darwin: In the short term we don’t see any data that is going to help its situation. Perth has seen a doubling of the properties on the market between 2014 and 2016 and they have a long way to go to show signs of growth. It is relatively cheap buying in Perth at the moment but you need to pick the start of the next growth cycle and not just the bottom to ensure you are achieving capital growth.

So that’s our around the grounds for financial year 2016/2017. As you can see, its most certainly not a ‘one market’ approach and where you invest will most certainly dictate your returns in the lucky county.

Original article published at www.smartpropertyinvestment.com.au by Paul Glossop

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Market Place

Queensland’s population hits 5 million people today

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Queensland's population hits 5 million people today
PHOTO: Is this Queensland’s 5 millionth person? Cordy Kerr-Kennedy was born yesterday in Townsville. (ABC News: Mark Jeffery)

Queensland’s population has tipped the 5 million mark today, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has told State Parliament.

Ms Palaszczuk said several expectant families were on standby to welcome the state’s five-millionth resident.

“Somewhere today a brand new mum and dad will be eager to meet their new arrival,” she told the house.

“The whole family will want to know: is it a boy or is it a girl? And the doctor will say, ‘congratulations, it’s a Queenslander’.”

Ms Palaszczuk said the two main drivers of the increase were migration growth, particularly from New South Wales, and from 60,000 babies being born in the past year.

Queensland's population hits 5 million people today
PHOTO:
 The state’s five-millionth resident was born today.(ABC North Queensland: Nathalie Fernbach)

“Overseas and interstate migration is up by 50,000 people in the past year, 19,000 came from interstate … more than 12,000, or 230 a week, move from New South Wales to Queensland,” she said.

ABS data also revealed the fastest and largest-growing area in Queensland in 2016-17 was Pimpama on the Gold Coast, which grew by 3,000 people.

Large growth also occurred in Jimboomba on Brisbane’s south side and in North Lakes — a suburb north of the city — which both increased by 2,100 people.

Coomera on the Gold Coast and Springfield Lakes in Ipswich also experienced large growth up 1,400 people.

The State Government’s population counter gives a “synthetic estimate” of the number of current Queenslanders, assuming a total population increase of one person every 6 minutes and 22 seconds.

Earlier this year the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) said Queensland’s population was growing at 1.7 per cent and was projected to tick over to 5 million in May.

ABS data released in March also revealed Brisbane was one of the country’s fastest-growing cities and had increased by 48,000 in 2017, hitting 2.4 million people.

Queensland's population hits 5 million people today
PHOTO: The ABS estimated Queensland’s population was growing 1.7 per cent a year. (AAP: Dan Peled)

ABS demography director Anthony Grubb said the state’s population had “come a long way” in the last century.

“In 1901 the population was half a million; a tenth of what it is today… it took 37 years to hit the 1 million milestone in 1938 and another 36 years to reach 2 million in 1974,” he said.

But Mr Grubb said population growth “picked up the pace” after that, taking just 18 years to reach 3 million then only another 14 years to hit 4 million in 2006.

Queensland could be leading growth state in future

Population demographer Dr Elin Charles-Edwards said although Queensland is not currently the fastest growing state, it is possible it could top the leader board later down the track.

‘Not in the short-term, but Queensland is coming up off a relatively subdued growth so perhaps we might be entering an era of more rapid growth,” she said.

Dr Charles-Edwards said the challenges that generally come with increased population could be managed in Queensland.

“As long as we keep up and don’t take our eye off the ball we can continue to absorb quite high levels of growth… but really it’s keeping up with the infrastructure that’s the key challenge,” she said.

Dr Charles-Edwards said it was important to note some parts of the state, particularly in western Queensland, were experiencing population decline.

“While the south-east corner is growing and also many Indigenous communities are growing, other parts of the state are shrinking,” she said.

“Perhaps we could do more to encourage people to move outside the south-east corner.

“If we were able to work out some way to decentralise our population, growth a little bit further up into the northern regional centres, I think that would benefit the growth of south-east Queensland.”

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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APRA to end cap on property investor loan growth

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APRA to end cap on property investor loan growth

APRA is removing the 10 per cent ‘speed limit’ on investor loan growth.
Photo: Louise Kennerley


The banking regulator is axing a 10 per cent speed limit on bank lending to property investors, saying the cap has served its purpose and improved credit standards.

With Sydney house prices falling and credit growth slowing, the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority on Thursday said it would remove the cap for bank boards that could prove they had been following its guidelines on prudent lending.

In late 2014, amid a surge in borrowing by property investors and rapid house price growth, APRA took the rare step of setting a 10 per cent limit on the annual growth in banks’ housing investor loan portfolios.

The measure has rocked the mortgage market in recent years, prompting banks to jack up interest rates for housing investors, and demand borrowers stump up bigger deposits.

But on Thursday, APRA chairman Wayne Byres said it was prepared to remove the measure because there had been an improvement in lending standards and a slowdown in credit growth.

“The temporary benchmark on investor loan growth has served its purpose. Lending growth has moderated, standards have been lifted and oversight has improved,” Mr Byres

Even so, the regulator will retain a separate 2017 policy that requires banks to limit their new interest-only lending to less than 30 per cent of all new home loan approvals.

APRA also said there was “more to do” in improving other aspects of banks’ lending, including how they assessed borrowers’ expenses, their existing debts, and the approval of loans that fell outside of banks’ formal lending policies.

APRA said it expected banks to introduce limits on the proportion of new lending that could be done at “very high” debt-to-income levels.

“In the current environment, APRA supervisors will continue to closely monitor any changes in lending standards,” Mr Byres said.

“The benchmark on interest-only lending will also continue to apply. APRA will consider the need for further changes to its approach as conditions evolve, in consultation with the other members of the Council of Financial Regulators.”

Source: brisbaneinvestor.com.au

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Brisbane’s population picks up, but more people moving to Pimpama

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Brisbane’s population picks up, but more people moving to Pimpama

Brisbane’s population hit 2.4 million in June 2017, according to ABS figures.Source:Supplied

BRISBANE is back among Australia’s fastest-growing cities thanks to a growth spurt, but more people are flocking to areas outside the state’s capital.

New figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show the city’s population grew by 48,000 in the year to June 2017 to hit 2.4 million — the fastest rate of growth in four years.

Brisbane’s population picks up, but more people moving to Pimpama

Suburban homes in Brisbane’s southwest.Source:News Corp Australia

In Brisbane, net overseas migration was the biggest contributor to the surge, with 38 per cent of the population growth coming from overseas.

Births accounted for 37 per cent of the growth, while interstate migration accounted for 25 per cent.

The fastest and largest-growing area in Queensland is Pimpama on the Gold Coast, which grew by 3000 people or 31 per cent in 2016-17.

Brisbane’s population picks up, but more people moving to Pimpama
An aerial shot of Pimpama on the northern end of the Gold Coast. Picture: skyepicsaerialphotography.Source:Supplied

Net internal migration was the main driver of growth, accounting for almost 90 per cent of population change.

Other areas to experience significant population growth include Jimboomba on the southern outskirts of Brisbane, North Lakes-Mango Hill in the Moreton Bay region, Coomera on the Gold Coast and Springfield Lakes in Ipswich.

 Brisbane’s population picks up, but more people moving to Pimpama

Springfield Lakes has experienced strong population growth, according to the ABS.Source:News Limited

Ripley in Ipswich, the inner Brisbane suburb of Newstead and Peregian Springs on the Sunshine Coast were the fastest growing areas in the state in 2016-17.

ABS demography director Anthony Grubb said the latest population estimates were the first to include data on the components driving population growth in capital cities and regions.

“It is now possible to not only see how much population is changing in an area, but to understand why this change is occurring”, he said.

Michael Matusik, director of independent property advisory Matusik Property Insights, believes Queensland’s improving population growth should impact house prices, but it hadn’t so far because the state’s economy also needed to improve.

Brisbane’s population picks up, but more people moving to Pimpama

Houses in Ipswich, where areas like Springfield and Ripley are experiencing strong population growth.Source:News Limited

Mr Matusik told The Courier-Mail Pimpama’s population was growing at a rate he didn’t believe was sustainable.

“It’s a reflection of where land supply is on the Gold Coast at the moment and I think that will calm down,” he said.

“But if the Gold Coast is going to continue expanding, those areas will become more like North Lakes in due course.”

Sydney’s population grew by just over 100,000 people in one year for the first time, taking that city’s total numbers to 5.1 million.

Australia’s big east coast cities carried most of the growth — Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane accounted for over 70 per cent of Australia’s population increase.

Darwin, Adelaide and Perth grew at 1 per cent or less.

TOP FIVE POPULATION GROWTH AREAS IN QLD

Suburb Population change 2016-17 Population as at June 30, 2017

1. Pimpama, Gold Coast 30.8% 12,586

2. Jimboomba 7.9% 28,639

3. North Lakes-Mango Hill 6.7% 33,225

4. Coomera 10.3% 15,227

5. Springfield Lakes 8.7% 17,468

(Source: ABS)

Source: www.news.com.au

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